console.log(‘whut’)

So, technically, I’m 84% done the Intro to JavaScript class. I say technically because I can’t crack the code (OMG I’M HILARIOUS) on the last two exercises, and I’ve skipped ahead to see what the bonus project is, and have set up those HTML and CSS files (provided by Skillcrush) in JS Bin.

Right now it feels like I’m learning these bits and pieces of JavaScript, but am unclear about how to put them together and in what order. It’s like someone is teaching writing, and the student has learned: This is a declarative sentence. A question ends in a question mark – ? Sometimes you need to use semi-colons; sometimes not. Occasionally, something might have an exclamation!

But it’s like – what does that all MEAN? and which one goes where?

So have spent a good bit of time comparing my working code to the solution code, thinking that the LOOK like they match but apparently not because mine’s not working, and playing “where the fuck is the difference?” Like so:

theirs
I’m not going to tell you what I did wrong here, because it was so dumb I couldn’t even believe it.

The course has linked to a bunch of books and online sources to keep learning about JavaScript. One is called Eloquent JavaScript, which has this sentence in the introduction: “Because computers are dumb, pedantic beasts, programming is fundamentally tedious and frustrating.” HA.

Wish me luck on finishing the last couple of exercises, so I can do the bonus project without feeling sneaky. The exercises include working with some jQuery code, and include asking a prompt, swapping images, telling the code to wait, fading in an answer, making an object shake, and other fun stuff.

 

document.GetElementById(“javaScriptFun”)

Chugging along in the Intro to Javascript course. Am just about to start section #15 out of the 22. Everything still feels very clunky and weird to me in JavaScript, but I am trusting the Skillcrush peeps who keep assuring me that soon it will all become clear (or at least, clearer).

Had a lesson about debugging, and Skillcrush shared this article – Teaching Novice Programmers How to Debug Their Code over at code:union by Jesse Farmer. It’s a really interesting article despite the somewhat-uninteresting title.  The article’s point being that debugging is a skill that all programmers need, and so teaching of that skill is something that should be emphasized and intentionally done.

The idea that debugging means you didn’t do a good job in the first place definitely strikes a chord in me. “[Students] often feel that [debugging] time is wasted or that it’s a kind of punishment for them not being smart enough to write the correct code the first time through. “If I knew what I was doing,” they think to themselves, “I wouldn’t have to spend so much time debugging.”  ”

The article also notes: “Teaching [students] how to debug their own code effectively is the single most valuable skill we could teach — it’s the skill that makes acquiring all other programming skills easier.”

Anything that is going to make acquiring other programming skills easier is something that I want to know how to do, so bring it on, buggy code!

Coming up, we start learning about jQuery. I’m stoked.

 

THE DOM

I’ve been in beautiful California doing fun things, hence no blogging. I’ve been doing small chunks of the Intro to Javascript course, though, and am now on section 13 out of the 22.

Finally have been introduced to the DOM and what it is – and am amused to know that it has such an un-interesting actual name.

THE DOM to me sounds like something out of The Godfather, or perhaps 50 Shades of Grey.

Feel like I am getting a bit of a grasp on objects, properties, functions, etc. It’s all felt very theoretical though, so getting to really put it into action will be nice and hopefully make it feel more real. This article – Why You Learn the Most When you Feel like You’re Struggling as a Developer – has been helpful today. I’m also taking a freebie webinar by General Assembly on Introduction to Javascript soon – I always think that additional ways of looking at something I’m learning is a great way (usually) to get more insight.

Until them, back into THE DOM (said as dramatically as possible).

 

22

There are 22 sections in the Intro to Javascript class. Glad I did not wait to start – the first few lessons have been on computational thinking, logic, pseudocode and whatnot. Good stuff, very interesting, have zipped through. Don’t want to zip through too fast and not absorb any of it and have to revisit later in the class, though. I’m on the 6th section.

Question: does anyone ever create a flowchart and NOT run out of paper?

And yes, because I have a middle-schooler in my life, this title did make me think of:

You’re welcome.

Icon Indecision (plus some HTML!)

I’m at the point in the Skillcrush course where I need to create a “simple icon” in Illustrator. I’ve been noodling around with the Bezier game – https://bezier.method.ac/ – to try and feel a little bit more in control of the pen tool. It’s helpful, for sure.

I’d like to create an icon for this site and also for myself, for freelance/side projects.

I haven’t gotten very far. I’ve done some sketches, but nothing that I’m crazy about.

I have to get this completed in 4 days, when my Illustrator trial runs out.

Yikes.

I also did some html-ing of the practice PSD I’m working on. In addition, working with git to create a new branch, merge it with the master, and then push it up to GitHub.  Looks like I successfully did those first two things, but am stuck on pushing it to GitHub. Skillcrush has a main “questions” email that I have written to multiple times – they are super helpful and get back quickly. So I’ve sent along my screenshots and will hopefully get an update on where I went astray, and then actually have an updated repo.

Tonight I just added all the text to the html. Next I want to link in the images. And THEN tackle stying.

Things I’ve Learned: Bézier Curves Can Bite Me

We’re getting a little familiar with Illustrator. I’ve downloaded my free trial, and our first task after getting familiar with the workspace was to copy a very simple logo. This involved using Bézier curves, which I quickly learned I do not have a natural aptitude for.

The side of my thumb hurts from mashing down on it to try and bend my curves into submission.

I was not entirely successful by any means:

wobbly
Wobbly.

There’s an online game https://bezier.method.ac/ to help learn how to work with the pen tool and those incorrigible curves. Think I’m going to be spending some time in there to try and get a little better.